Contact us at 321-507-6058

Book Now Calendar
Proud Veteran Owned Business Member!
Book Now Calendar

Pre-Tour Information

What to Bring
– Comfortable Shorts/swim suit
– Water shoes/water socks if you have them (most people paddle barefoot)
– Sunscreen
– Bug spray
– Polarized Sunglasses
– Any necessary medications (inhaler / epi-pen)

About Mullet Creek

The Mullet Creek area supported a number of pre-historic cultures like the Jaega and Ais. These were nomadic
people who lived in small communities and roamed throughout the Southern Lagoon with little impact to the natural resources. Spanish Exploration in the 1500’s and English Colonization in the 1700’s, encouraged permanent settlement and cultivation of the land. The earliest record of pioneer activities in the Inlet Grove area was around 1883. George Ensey of Tropic, Florida purchased land to grow pineapples. After that, several others purchased or homesteaded land in the area, and began cultivating a variety of crops. The land changed hands several times until it was purchased by the Deerfield Partnership in 1987. It was operated as a citrus grove by the partnership until acquisition by the state. Research indicates that the citrus grove was first planted around 1925. Aside from a squatter who worked for a local fish camp named Honest Johns, no residences occurred on Mullet Creek Islands. Latham Island, one of the four Mullet Creek Islands, was used to raise hogs for the family and guests at the nearby Oak Lodge.

Residential development in the 1950’s spurred the need for mosquito control along the Indian River Lagoon. Prior to mosquito control activities, the islands were vegetated by salt marsh and mangrove swamp communities. In the 1950’s, a series of canals were excavated through Mullet Creek Islands, subdividing the four original islands into ten. Spoil from the dredging activities was deposited on the salt marsh and mangrove communities to eliminate mosquito breeding areas. The tidal swamp and marshes around Inlet Grove and Snag Point were also impounded in the 1950’s for mosquito control. *1

Indian River Lagoon

The Indian River Lagoon (IRL) is a unique, highly diverse, shallow-water estuary of national significance stretching along 40 percent of Florida’s east coast. While the IRL’s environmental importance is clear, the lagoon is also an economic engine, generating more than $3.7 billion per year to the state of Florida.

Do Not Feed Wildlife

Manatee

Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostrus) are found in the waters in the Mullet Creek area. This
Mammal is listed as state and federally endangered, but is currently under review by the Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission to determine its status in Florida. Brevard County contains a large population of manatees, with as many as 790 individuals observed during aerial surveys from September 1997 through September 1999. Manatees forage along seagrass beds in the lagoon and have been observed in the canals through Mullet Creek Islands. The entire area around the Mullet Creek is designated a year-round slow speed.

references

*1. About the Indian River Lagoon (INDIAN RIVER LAGOON STATE BUFFER PRESERVE LAND MANAGEMENT PLAN FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION OFFICE OF COASTAL AND AQUATIC MANAGED AREAS January 2004 – January 2013)

Get Adobe Flash player